Monday, 13 August 2018

Marijuana compound removes toxic Alzheimer’s protein from the brain

Salk Institute scientists have found preliminary evidence that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other compounds found in marijuana can promote the cellular removal of amyloid beta, a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

“Although other studies have offered evidence that cannabinoids might be neuroprotective against the symptoms of Alzheimer’s, we believe our study is the first to demonstrate that cannabinoids affect both inflammation and amyloid beta accumulation in nerve cells,” says Salk Professor David Schubert, the senior author of the paper.

THC is responsible for the majority of marijuana’s psychological effects, including the high, due to its natural pain-relieving properties.

Salk researchers have found that high levels of amyloid beta were associated with cellular inflammation and higher rates of neuron death. They demonstrated that exposing the cells to THC reduced amyloid beta protein levels and eliminated the inflammatory response from the nerve cells caused by the protein, thereby allowing the nerve cells to survive.

No comments:

Post a Comment

3 Days more to go for Alzheimers 2018 Conference

International  # Conference  on  # Alzheimers , Dementia and Related  # Neurodegenerative  Diseases on December 03-04, 2018 in Madrid, Spa...